I have encountered one main issue throughout my practice during this semester: separation. As someone who identifies as a single being, it is an odd request to provide a separation; it would be the equivalent of only having half the words in an essay. I have encountered one main issue throughout my practice during this semester: separation. As someone who identifies as a single being, it is an odd request to provide a separation; it would be the equivalent of only having half the words in an essay. 
This short piece of writing is titled Separation and is a part of my research portfolio. However (unlike my other pieces) it isn’t representing my findings. It is still current, and the response I receive will form an element of my research for the Reflective Report. Although I appreciate why in some cases the division of my work would be valuable, as collaborative partners often provide different skills, however, in my practice it discredits my research, my practice and my identity.   This short piece of writing is titled Separation and is a part of my research portfolio. However (unlike my other pieces) it isn’t representing my findings. It is still current, and the response I receive will form an element of my research for the Reflective Report. Although I appreciate why in some cases the division of my work would be valuable, as collaborative partners often provide different skills, however, in my practice it discredits my research, my practice and my identity.   
“Asked why they made a point of not distinguishing their separate contributions to the collaboration, George replied “Well it’s not based on that. It is ‘us’ doing it together”(Green, C. 2011). Similar to Gilbert and George; I find it unnecessary to provide separation and to expand on this it is near impossible to split something which has become my every day. In every task I complete, both bodies will be involved in one way or the other. Any separate tasks are now executed by both bodies, regardless of which body brought which skill to the practice. If one body did not commit to this way of living as one; the practice could not exist.  “Asked why they made a point of not distinguishing their separate contributions to the collaboration, George replied “Well it’s not based on that. It is ‘us’ doing it together” (Green, C. 2011). Similar to Gilbert and George; I find it unnecessary to provide separation and to expand on this it is near impossible to split something which has become my every day. In every task I complete, both bodies will be involved in one way or the other. Any separate tasks are now executed by both bodies, regardless of which body brought which skill to the practice. If one body did not commit to this way of living as one; the practice could not exist.  
Separation is a conceptual piece, which visibly shows the only separation I am willing to provide throughout my written practice – a visual 50/50. I can present it in many ways, by splitting the words in half or one part of me claiming the top section while the other half of me claims the bottom, but the content stands as equal. This specific style is me sharing every other word and should be read flickering between the two columns. It represents the struggle I experienced when trying to divide my work.    Separation is a conceptual piece, which visibly shows the only separation I am willing to provide throughout my written practice – a visual 50/50. I can present it in many ways, by splitting the words in half or one part of me claiming the top section while the other half of me claims the bottom, but the content stands as equal. This specific style is me sharing every other word and should be read flickering between the two columns. It represents the struggle I experienced when trying to divide my work.    

Bibliography

Glover, M. (2017) Gilbert and George: What exactly do we remember them for? [Online] available from <https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/features/gilbert-and-george-white-cube-tate-spitalfields-beard-pictures-a8053916.html> [Accessed: 18/04/2020] 

Green, C. (2011) ‘Doubles, Dopplegängers, and the Third Hand’ in The Third Hand: collaboration in art from conceptualism to postmodernism. e.d. by Green, C. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 179-188 

Hines, T. (2013) Collaborative Form: Studies in the Relations of the Arts. [Online] Asland: The Kent University Press. Available from <https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/coventry/reader.action?docID=4403424>  

Miller, J. (2011) ‘Yes, but is it Edible’ Art Monthly 349(4) 

 Tate (2010) Gilbert & George: A portrait of the Artists as Young Men. [Online] available from <https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/gilbert-george-a-portrait-of-the-artists-as-young-men-t01704> [Accessed: 10/04/2020]